ASRock.com Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Technical Support > Intel Motherboards
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Wont Post: Code B6 shown
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Wont Post: Code B6 shown

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
30GHz View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 20 Jul 2015
Status: Offline
Points: 13
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 30GHz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Wont Post: Code B6 shown
    Posted: 06 Feb 2016 at 3:10am
I  have a X99M/Killer3.1 with BIOS 1.4 and 1.3, it was working fine with my settings for some time.
 
After I saved the BIOS settings for the 500th(literally --original tweaking) time, it wouldn't reboot.
 
I cleared the CMOS with the battery and button, replaced the battery and PSU(top of the line, before this happened) also.
 
It was displaying various codes like AF, but now it is consistent at b6. BIOS A or B it is the same.
 
I had a bad video card once but that showed d6. I could try a diff GPU.
 
Seems like somethings wrong with the Mobo? Maybe it can't clear/write to NVRAM anymore? (supposed to withstand 100K writes!)
Back to Top
Xaltar View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 16 May 2015
Status: Offline
Points: 5342
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Xaltar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Feb 2016 at 3:54am
Codes beginning with "b" seem to be either memory or USB related by your manual. Have you tried powering up the system with only the essentials connected? 

Have you changed anything inside your PC before this happened? 

I would try removing the CPU and RAM from the system and reseating them after checking for damaged pins/contacts on the socket/CPU and then try posting with just 1 module of RAM in each slot consecutively.

I highly doubt BIOS writes could be the problem, especially since you tried both A and B BIOS chips. 
Back to Top
30GHz View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 20 Jul 2015
Status: Offline
Points: 13
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 30GHz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Feb 2016 at 10:24am
AMI Bios  documentation says b6 means "NVRAM Clean-Up"
 
I tried with diff RAM in diff slots, no USB plugs, and replacing the GPU and even the entire motherboard.
 
Even without a GPU it syas B6.
 
It seems like my CPU must damaged, weird that it isn't completely dead, just non-functional.
Back to Top
parsec View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 04 May 2015
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 5001
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote parsec Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Feb 2016 at 12:07pm
Originally posted by 30GHz 30GHz wrote:

AMI Bios  documentation says b6 means "NVRAM Clean-Up"
 
I tried with diff RAM in diff slots, no USB plugs, and replacing the GPU and even the entire motherboard.
 
Even without a GPU it syas B6.
 
It seems like my CPU must damaged, weird that it isn't completely dead, just non-functional.


If the CPU were dead or missing, the code displayed is "00".

To be absolutely clear, are you seeing B6 or b6 in the Dr Debug display? You've used B6 or b6 in the thread title, and other posts.

The Dr Debug display is a seven segment character LCD display, using only straight bar segments for each part of a character. That means it is unable to show any curves in a character.

Therefore, how does this type of character display differentiate between the digit 8 and capital B? It can't.



The character 'B' must be displayed as a lower case 'b'. The same is true for '0' and 'D', lower case 'd' is used.

So if we see "86" in the Dr Debug display, that is the number eighty six (or eight six.) Hexadecimal "B6" is shown as "b6". "D6" is shown as "d6".

So which is it, b6 or 86?   Smile

One odd thing that comes to mind given your question about the NVRAM and b6 meaning NVRAM cleanup, is the 1.40 UEFI has in its description, "Improve Clear CMOS function.". That would be rather ironic if you get the code for NVRAM cleanup, whatever it is, b6 or 86.

Code 86 is the wonderful "Chipset initialization error", whose fix is "Press Reset or clear the CMOS". I have seen Reset do amazing things.

Your first post said you've used UEFIs 1.30 and 1.40 fine for some time. Plus you used the 'B' UEFI, which is whatever version number on the B BIOS chip, which is likely 1.10. So the UEFI version itself makes no difference it seems, correct?

Any reason beyond it seems to be the CPU, that you think the CPU has failed?

AF is a problem related to a SATA device. The chipset is where the SATA support is located, so possibly why the chipset error code. Any drives connected to the board currently?


Back to Top
wardog View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Status: Offline
Points: 6334
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wardog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Feb 2016 at 1:11pm
If you saw AF displayed recently that isn't a good sign. Not good at all.

Read LancerVI's post linked below concerning AF on an ASUS X99 board.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1510328/asus-x99-motherboard-series-official-support-thread-north-american-users-only/4520#post_23401334
X370 SLI/ac(r1.03, BIOS 5.10), 1500X, H115i, F4-4133C19D-16GTZA, 970 EVO M.2 250GB + 500GB, Tt Core X9 Black

16,441 - https://www.3dmark.com/fs/13030306
Back to Top
parsec View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 04 May 2015
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 5001
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote parsec Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Feb 2016 at 2:06pm
Asus really seems to have trouble with their X99 boards, from the OC socket seemingly frying processors with high voltage, to that weird thread wardog linked above.

I wonder about the AF code in that thread. Notice his board had the CPU failure LED on.

The AMI 2.2 BIOS POST code list shows AF as: System boot initialization

How the board could get to System Boot initialization if the CPU was shot makes no sense... unless POST was not really run since it couldn't, and the last POST code is displayed, which would be
System boot initialization.

Nothing like changing my mind in the middle of a post... sudden CPU death syndrome?

Back to Top
30GHz View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 20 Jul 2015
Status: Offline
Points: 13
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 30GHz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Feb 2016 at 5:21pm
b6 for sure
 
I replaced the motherboard so both 1.4A/1.3B and the new board 1.3A/B don't work, it counts through 19 and you can see it iterating up to b6 where it stops.
 
It was stopping at random 19, AF codes when it wouldn't reboot, even after CMOS clear. Then it started being consistent with b6 so I think it was breaking during those stages.
 
The decision to replace the CPU is due to the process of elimination since it's not the MB or RAM and that's the only things connected. THE PSU is brand new respected-name brand.
 
I did have the CPU running at near 1.5V for 6mos. so it does make sense that it could be, but I agree that it's weird that a CPU can be partially broken without being completely dead.


Edited by 30GHz - 09 Feb 2016 at 5:23pm
Back to Top
parsec View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 04 May 2015
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 5001
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote parsec Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Feb 2016 at 10:29pm
Yes, 1.5V for a Haswell-E processor is rather high. That is usually 0.02V below the maximum VID that those processors are programmed to use.

Some over clockers would call that a "suicide run" at 1.5V. Meaning they would let the PC boot at that speed for a screen shot of CPU-Z for their high OC, and then immediately restart into the BIOS to reset to a lower voltage.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.06
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.061 seconds.