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Why did you build a RYZEN system?

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twf85 View Drop Down
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    Posted: 01 Apr 2017 at 2:34am
For those out there who were either brave or excited enough to take a gamble on AMD's latest, what motivated you?

If your last computer was an Intel build, what ended up being the reason you switched to AMD for this build?

What parts did you use in your build?

What problems, if any, have you experienced thus far?

Do you think RYZEN will be enough to turn the tide for AMD?
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I'm just tired of using a cpu with 4c8t and can't afford x99 platform.Although ryzen 1700 is not such powerful as intel 7700k in gaming, but not lag behind too much
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ronin4740 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Apr 2017 at 4:17am
Hadn't upgraded in forever (i7 920) and always liked an underdog.  Back in the early days I ran Cyrix processors :)

Ryzen seemed like a good value for the cost and I felt like rewarding AMD for their hard work in the hopes they'll continue to improve the product line and give Intel a reason to look over their shoulder again.


Edited by Ronin4740 - 01 Apr 2017 at 4:18am
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twf85 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote twf85 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Apr 2017 at 4:27am
Originally posted by qwased qwased wrote:

I'm just tired of using a cpu with 4c8t and can't afford x99 platform.Although ryzen 1700 is not such powerful as intel 7700k in gaming, but not lag behind too much

Do you believe AMD's comments regarding the potential for improvement in terms of game-specific code optimizations?

Originally posted by Ronin4740 Ronin4740 wrote:

Hadn't upgraded in forever (i7 920) and always liked an underdog.  Back in the early days I ran Cyrix processors :)

Ryzen seemed like a good value for the cost and I felt like rewarding AMD for their hard work in the hopes they'll continue to improve the product line and give Intel a reason to look over their shoulder again.

Intel users, diehard and casual alike, seem to be split in the way they've responded to RYZEN. Many are using their buying decisions to air grievances over cost and a perceived lack of innovation, while others seem to be as supportive of Intel as they ever have been.

What caused you to assume your current position?


Edited by twf85 - 01 Apr 2017 at 4:33am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote patchfile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Apr 2017 at 4:52am
We built two Ryzen computers at my house, one for the wife and one for me. My old computer was built in 2010, hers was pieced together from parts from 2007 to 2010, so it was passed time for new computers.

We watched and waited for months to see if Ryzen would be worth buying, or if we were finally going to switch back to Intel (Our last Intel CPU was in 2002). When Ryzen 7 turned out to be great at everything, I went ahead and ordered two R7 1700's. I had to order different motherboards because of Newegg's preorder policy of one motherboard model per customer. I ended up with the X370 Killer/ac, the wife now has the B350 fatality K4. 

Problems; RAM has been an issue. Ryzen boards did not like some of the RAM we purchased, but we have sorted that out.

Why did I choose Ryzen? I don't want to support Intel, they tend to squeeze every dime out of their customers, I just don't like the way they do business.

AMD on the other hand has been making affordable products for gamers for a long while. They may not be top of the line, or have all the new bells and whistles, but they do what needs to be done and they do it at a price that is acceptable. 

We did spend a little extra on the CPU's this time around, but I feel that it will be well worth it in the long run. In 5 to 7 years I will still be using this 8 core, 16 thread monster, and probably be very happy with it.

I think Ryzen has already proven itself to be a real competitor to Intel CPU's. R5 and R3 will only increase AMD's market share. Competition is good for us, and it is really good for technology. Having two companies try to out tech each other means we may see great gains in CPU's that have been missing for the last 10 years or so.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ronin4740 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Apr 2017 at 5:29am
Originally posted by twf85 twf85 wrote:


Originally posted by Ronin4740 Ronin4740 wrote:

Hadn't upgraded in forever (i7 920) and always liked an underdog.  Back in the early days I ran Cyrix processors :)

Ryzen seemed like a good value for the cost and I felt like rewarding AMD for their hard work in the hopes they'll continue to improve the product line and give Intel a reason to look over their shoulder again.

Intel users, diehard and casual alike, seem to be split in the way they've responded to RYZEN. Many are using their buying decisions to air grievances over cost and a perceived lack of innovation, while others seem to be as supportive of Intel as they ever have been.

What caused you to assume your current position?

So, back in the early days of 386's, 486's, the Pentium and the Pentium II Intel slugged it out with AMD and Cyrix in the IBM compatible space and Motorola in the overall Personal Computer arena.  As I said I'm a fan of a fair, multiple dog fight so, after buying a Microsoft Surface to replace an aging laptop around Christmas time I started to think about upgrading my desktop as well.  

I looked hard at prebuilt systems and nearly pulled the trigger on an Intel based Alienware system at the same time I purchased the Surface but decided to wait.  Last month I started to do a bit of research related to building out a machine and that's when I learned about Ryzen.  

I waited patiently for the first batches of CPU's to ship and read many of the published reviews.  I'd hoped the Ryzen CPU's would blow the doors off of comparable Intel processors but wasn't all that  disappointed to learn that they're fast but a bit slower than comparable Intel Procs - that's the way it was in the 90's when comparing Non-Intel Procs to Intel Procs.  

Maybe the performance advantage Intel has over AMD's Ryzen is partially due to everything out there which runs on a PC being code optimized to run on Intel chips... Maybe it's truly a design advantage.  The point is unless Ryzen sells fairly well and gains a bit more market share for AMD we'll never really know what it might be capable of because software houses won't spend their time doing any code optimization and Ryzen's legacy will be a paragraph or so on a Wikipedia page.  

My hope when choosing Ryzen to build a system around is that enough others will follow suit and this will energize AMD into being able to compete on a more even level with Intel through building on Ryzen's design.  In my mind we ALL win when two companies like Intel and AMD are slugging it out in the same space trying to maintain or claim dominance over the other.  It spurs technological innovation and drives prices down.  

...and it makes me happy when I remember those early days of home computing, system building, manually setting IRQ's and booting from floppy disk :)

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote qwased Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Apr 2017 at 6:12am
Originally posted by twf85 twf85 wrote:


Do you believe AMD's comments regarding the potential for improvement in terms of game-specific code optimizations?


Maybe it will in the future games.But for most of the games we are playing now,it is naerly impossible to ask the game makers to spend time (and money) on updating a game already sold for 1~2 years .It is uneconomical.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote parsec Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Apr 2017 at 10:51am
My incoming Ryzen system (next week) will be simply to really see what it's all about in real world usage.

I must say that gaming is not the only use or reason to have a PC. For those that dismiss Ryzen for not beating every Intel processor in gaming performance, your view of the world is very narrow.

Ryzen processors were released for retail sale in the first week of March. Has it even been four weeks since then? To be coming to conclusions about it now is extremely premature.

AMD has yet to provide updates to mother board manufactures to fix several issues, including the FMA3 instruction bug. There are other updates that won't be released until May. Who knows if those will be the last. For example:

https://www.techpowerup.com/231997/amd-community-update-bios-updates-patches-performance-improvements

Improvements in game performance are also beginning to appear, as games are being updated specifically for Ryzen systems.

Memory compatibility has been a major issue with Ryzen, as owners know. The Ryzen memory controller is not the same as Intel's, and all existing DDR4 memory has been designed to work with the four Intel processor generations that support DDR4, the only ones that existed before Ryzen. The main problem is the timing settings, and that some of the speeds that Intel supports are not supported by Ryzen (DDR4 3000 and 3400). The XMP data for Intel systems is not compatible with Ryzen systems.

One of the main questions I have is, why are the memory manufactures seemingly so behind in providing Ryzen specific memory in the marketplace? That is, plug and play memory, which we have been accustomed to for a long time. We saw some memory incompatibility between the various Intel DDR4 platforms, again caused by mismatches in the SPD and XMP data.

Ryzen is far from a mature platform, all of the first generation Ryzen processors are not even available yet! I also will be building a Ryzen system to learn about it, since it will be with us for a while, and is worth getting to know. But the relationship is just getting started.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote twf85 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Apr 2017 at 10:50pm
Originally posted by parsec parsec wrote:

My incoming Ryzen system (next week) will be simply to really see what it's all about in real world usage.

So you weren't satisfied simply reading about it, you wanted to see for yourself? That's an intriguing reason..

Originally posted by parsec parsec wrote:

I must say that gaming is not the only use or reason to have a PC. For those that dismiss Ryzen for not beating every Intel processor in gaming performance, your view of the world is very narrow.

I haven't gamed in years, so I'm with you on this point. It's been a little irritating trying to keep up with Ryzen news when its mostly been about gaming, thus far.

Originally posted by parsec parsec wrote:

One of the main questions I have is, why are the memory manufactures seemingly so behind in providing Ryzen specific memory in the marketplace? That is, plug and play memory, which we have been accustomed to for a long time. We saw some memory incompatibility between the various Intel DDR4 platforms, again caused by mismatches in the SPD and XMP data.

Well, it stands to reason that if the MOBO manufacturers weren't given a sufficient amount of time to develop their boards, then how could the memory manufacturers have had enough time? In other words, if there weren't fully formed MOBOs to work with, what were the memory manufacturers supposed to have used to test with?

Originally posted by parsec parsec wrote:

Ryzen is far from a mature platform, all of the first generation Ryzen processors are not even available yet! I also will be building a Ryzen system to learn about it, since it will be with us for a while, and is worth getting to know. But the relationship is just getting started.

Given your vast knowledge of computers, and this comment, I'd say that you may work in some IT related field.. True?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Asylum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Apr 2017 at 4:34pm
Originally posted by twf85 twf85 wrote:

For those out there who were either brave or excited enough to take a gamble on AMD's latest, what motivated you?

If your last computer was an Intel build, what ended up being the reason you switched to AMD for this build?
The reason why I upgraded to an 1800X was because I saw the platform I had was at risk of becoming a bottleneck in the future due to newer games capping my CPU and even 3DMark was making fun of me saying, "GPU is ready to rumble, but your CPU doesn't want to play" Unhappy lol Ryzen's new design and performance attracted me for the price... and to me, 8 cores are the future, like the same as when dual core came out, and I go where there the future is because I am a computer enthusiast, and keeping up with technology and building computers has been my hobby my whole life.
Originally posted by twf85 twf85 wrote:

What parts did you use in your build?
This is what I originally went with but had to RMA the Taichi...

AMD Ryzen 1800x
G.Skill DDR4 3866 @ 3200
Asrock Taichi X370
XFX Radeon R9 390X @ 1100/1400
2x OCZ Vertex 4 raid 0 (512gb)
WD Black 1TB HDD
Corsair HX1200i
Originally posted by twf85 twf85 wrote:

What problems, if any, have you experienced thus far?
Corrupted bios issues.
Originally posted by twf85 twf85 wrote:

Do you think RYZEN will be enough to turn the tide for AMD?
I hope so because a one horse race is no fun.
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