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AMD FX 6300 overheats....

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    Posted: 26 Mar 2017 at 11:34am
Originally posted by quagmire94 quagmire94 wrote:

also i fixed the issue by clearing bios.  pc boots in 5 seconds to desktop .
and awareness is everything i too your idea on getting a better powersupply, now has a 
thermaltake 1000w power supply with 1 single 12v rail at 60 amps.
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV
          >   >   >  Thank you all for helping me with this issue < <   < 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^




Hooray!!!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote quagmire94 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Mar 2017 at 8:58am
also i fixed the issue by clearing bios.  pc boots in 5 seconds to desktop .
and awareness is everything i too your idea on getting a better powersupply, now has a 
thermaltake 1000w power supply with 1 single 12v rail at 60 amps.
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV
          >   >   >  Thank you all for helping me with this issue < <   < 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote quagmire94 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Mar 2017 at 9:15am
[QUOTE=Xaltar]   im planning on grabbing   1 750W power supply ,  im just curious. why is 23 amps Not enough for a 1060 , and 20 amps for the cpu on the other rail ?
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817153198&ignorebbr=1

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote quagmire94 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Mar 2017 at 9:04am
Thermaltake 12v1 23 amp 12v2 20 amp. and looks like Neither image it's a thermaltake tr2 and has a Red label 

THe combo had contained
VVVVVVVVVVVVV
ASrock 970 pro3  
amd 6300
Ripjaws X g.skill ddr3 1600 mhz '''''' JUST ONE STICK'''' pain in the rear later i had to buy more ram....
darn dual channel motherboards ..
1 tb hhd 
no brand computer case.... and a 300w power supply '''''' i got the thermaltake because a 300w power supply with no brand is Dangerous for gaming .''''''''

and corsair sent me a brand new h100iv2. yes it's their current model ''my cpu is overclocked to 4.3 ghz btw.''' with those temps.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote quagmire94 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Mar 2017 at 8:54am
whole lotta duscussion i was working and had no time to reply. where to begin

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote wardog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Mar 2017 at 4:02pm
quagmire, you getting this sorted out there? How's things?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Xaltar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Mar 2017 at 12:12am
Thanks for the clarification on the time frame. I guess I took the whole "Haswell Ready" badge on some newer PSUs to mean that the update occurred then. 

To be honest this isn't something I have ever really had to think about in my own builds. When I first started out in the industry I was building servers with dual redundant PSUs and high efficiency enterprise solutions. I learned very quickly the importance of the PSU and have always built my systems around the latest high quality unit I can afford that meets my power needs. While I have always advised against using "cheapo" PSUs it wasn't until fairly recently that I started seeing this issue with high end PSUs being as bad (almost) as cheap units because of the changeover.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote parsec Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Mar 2017 at 11:29pm
Originally posted by Xaltar Xaltar wrote:

If it is indeed the dual rail model then it is very likely the case. 24a on the better of the 2 rails only ~300w and the other is nearer ~200w. Neither of thes rails is up to handing the CPU and GPU. 

Also note that it says "Max Power 600w" that does not make it a 600w PSU. Between the 2 rails it is 500w at best and that is on a dual rail setup which isn't ideal on modern hardware unless those rails are rated at 30a minimum each. Then we are talking a quality dual rail PSU, this smacks of the ultra budget junk we all too often see rated higher than it is capable of performing. I can't help but feel the dual rail version is an older pre Haswell model where the ratings were different given the higher importance of the 5v rail. I can't believe Thermaltake would make something this junky for current hardware.

For those reading that are confused:

Haswell and onward changed the voltage priority from 5v to 12v. Any PSU predating Haswell will have a strong 5v rail and weaker 12v rails. This is why we sometimes see people with high power PSUs having power issues, their 700w pre Haswell PSU is only equivalent to a 400w modern psu (for example), less if it has dual 12v rails.

For a modern system that includes a discrete GPU you should look for a power supply with a minimum of 40a on the 12v rail for lower end GPUs and 50a+ on high end GPUs. 50a gives you 600w on the 12v rail. If you look at the 2 models of PSU I showed earlier you will see the single rail model is exactly 50a and 600w, that is correct for a system like this one.


The change from 5V to 12V as the major rail for a mother board happened long before Haswell. Otherwise, the description is spot on.

Proof of that is easily seen by checking a mother board for the 4/8 pin CPU +12V power connector. That is the power input for the CPU's VRMs. If we check Intel socket 775 mother boards and processors (circa 2008), we find the four or eight pin CPU power connector. For example:

http://www.asrock.com/mb/Intel/G31DE/index.asp#Specification

We can also see that with AMD socket 939 boards (circa 2006):

http://www.asrock.com/mb/ULi/939SLI-eSATA2/index.asp#Specification

This change is also related to the introduction of PCI Express as the interface for graphics cards, replacing AGP. While there were multiple variations of the AGP slot interface, most used 5V power for the graphics cards. PCI Express graphics cards use the 12V rail for their major power source.

The PSU rail compatibility problem (5V or 12V as the major rail) is related to legacy compatibility, and in some cases the PSU manufacture's reluctance to provide new designs. At the time of the transition to the 12V rail as the major rail, systems that required the 5V rail to provide more power were the majority in use. It was difficult (expensive) to provide high power on both the 5V and 12V rails at the same time, and PSU design became a balancing act for each rail. PC builders had to choose the appropriate PSU for their system. That reality became forgotten as time passed.

The power output capability of the 5V rail remained high for backward compatibility, but was unnecessary for the new systems. Some PSU manufactures were slow to reduce the 5V rail's capacity, while new model 750W+ PSUs will only provide 20A on the 5V rail. That is more than enough for modern PC systems. Unfortunately, old PSU designs for the 5V major rail era are still being sold today, at bargain prices.

The single and multiple 12V rail designs are another aspect of PSU design. Multiple 12V rail designs can be safer when the components being powered fail, but require the user to correctly balance the hardware connected to the multiple rails. That is the major problem with that design.

The single 12V rail design is considered "better", but really because it is simpler to use (no load balancing), component failure is rare, and PSU protection circuits are better and standard on most PSUs. A high quality multiple 12V rail PSU design adds more cost than consumers are willing to spend, and is really not necessary.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wardog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Mar 2017 at 5:57pm
Originally posted by Xaltar Xaltar wrote:

If it is indeed the dual rail model then it is very likely the case. 24a on the better of the 2 rails only ~300w and the other is nearer ~200w. Neither of thes rails is up to handing the CPU and GPU. 

Also note that it says "Max Power 600w" that does not make it a 600w PSU. Between the 2 rails it is 500w at best and that is on a dual rail setup which isn't ideal on modern hardware unless those rails are rated at 30a minimum each. Then we are talking a quality dual rail PSU, this smacks of the ultra budget junk we all too often see rated higher than it is capable of performing. I can't help but feel the dual rail version is an older pre Haswell model where the ratings were different given the higher importance of the 5v rail. I can't believe Thermaltake would make something this junky for current hardware.

For those reading that are confused:

Haswell and onward changed the voltage priority from 5v to 12v. Any PSU predating Haswell will have a strong 5v rail and weaker 12v rails. This is why we sometimes see people with high power PSUs having power issues, their 700w pre Haswell PSU is only equivalent to a 400w modern psu (for example), less if it has dual 12v rails.

For a modern system that includes a discrete GPU you should look for a power supply with a minimum of 40a on the 12v rail for lower end GPUs and 50a+ on high end GPUs. 50a gives you 600w on the 12v rail. If you look at the 2 models of PSU I showed earlier you will see the single rail model is exactly 50a and 600w, that is correct for a system like this one.


I smell a Sticky here


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Xaltar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Mar 2017 at 5:06pm
If it is indeed the dual rail model then it is very likely the case. 24a on the better of the 2 rails only ~300w and the other is nearer ~200w. Neither of thes rails is up to handing the CPU and GPU. 

Also note that it says "Max Power 600w" that does not make it a 600w PSU. Between the 2 rails it is 500w at best and that is on a dual rail setup which isn't ideal on modern hardware unless those rails are rated at 30a minimum each. Then we are talking a quality dual rail PSU, this smacks of the ultra budget junk we all too often see rated higher than it is capable of performing. I can't help but feel the dual rail version is an older pre Haswell model where the ratings were different given the higher importance of the 5v rail. I can't believe Thermaltake would make something this junky for current hardware.

For those reading that are confused:

Haswell and onward changed the voltage priority from 5v to 12v. Any PSU predating Haswell will have a strong 5v rail and weaker 12v rails. This is why we sometimes see people with high power PSUs having power issues, their 700w pre Haswell PSU is only equivalent to a 400w modern psu (for example), less if it has dual 12v rails.

For a modern system that includes a discrete GPU you should look for a power supply with a minimum of 40a on the 12v rail for lower end GPUs and 50a+ on high end GPUs. 50a gives you 600w on the 12v rail. If you look at the 2 models of PSU I showed earlier you will see the single rail model is exactly 50a and 600w, that is correct for a system like this one.


Edited by Xaltar - 12 Mar 2017 at 5:07pm
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