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X370 Killer SLI huge volt. drop, impossible to OC

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adsaidler View Drop Down
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    Posted: 29 Dec 2017 at 9:20am
Guys, I really need some help here.

I'm trying to overclock a 1800x to 4Ghz, and it's proving to be a nightmare on this board.

When I set the voltage to 1.45v on Ryzen Master and start stress testing with AIDA64, the voltage drops to an average of 1.378v, and the system crashes after a couple of minutes. Monitoring is done using HWINFO64.

I tried setting the voltage to 1.4625v and later 1.46875v; this allowed the average voltage under load to stay around 1.4v, keeping the system stable for around 15min, when i stopped stress testing.

The issue is that when idling, it idles to this extremely high voltage.

There is no Load Line Calibration option in the BIOS; it was discussed in a topic here that it was removed from newer versions of the  X370 Killer SLI.

I tried OCing from the BIOS, with no success; setting the voltage to 1.45v and the clock to 3900 or 4000mhz doesn't post.

I'm running out of options here, and really regretted getting this board. Any advice would be really appreciated!


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PetrolHead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PetrolHead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Dec 2017 at 3:01pm
First things first, I hope you know that 1.35V is the highest Vcore that AMD consideres safe for 24/7 use. Go higher than that and you'll risk damaging your CPU in the long term. Another thing you should keep in mind is that not all Ryzen CPUs can do 4GHz and stay stable. Depending on whether you lose or win in the silicon lottery, your CPU may be able to achieve anything between 3.8GHz and 4.1GHz before hitting the Vcore wall. Having the 1800X does not guarantee better overclocking results than with, say, a 1700.

Personally I'd forget Ryzen Master and overclock from the BIOS in small steps. If you want to squeeze everything your system has to give, just start by setting Vcore to 1.35V and clock speed to 3.7GHz. Then keep increasing the clock speed until your system is not stable. When you find the point of instability, you're close to your maximum safe overclock. If HWMonitor and the like are showing Vcore below 1.35V you may still have some headroom for bumping the voltage, but Ryzen chips tend to hit a Vcore wall around the safe voltage, so to get a 100MHz increase in clockspeed you may need to increase the Vcore so that you'll end up in danger zone.

By the way, what PSU and cooling solution are you using? And what temperatures has the CPU been hitting when you've been testing with AIDA64?
Ryzen 5 1500X, ASRock AB350M Pro4, 2x8 GB G.Skill Trident Z 3466CL16, Sapphire Pulse RX Vega56 8G HBM2, Corsair RM550x, Samsung 960 EVO SSD (NVMe) 250GB, Samsung 850 EVO SSD 500 GB, Windows 10 64-bit
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adsaidler View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote adsaidler Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Dec 2017 at 7:08pm
Thanks for the reply, PetrolHead!

I'm aware of the safe voltage for 24/7 usage, but an AMD representative disclosed a couple of months ago that 1.45v was the maximum voltage that should be used for more extreme overclocks.

This is not the issue thou. The issue is the voltage dropping absurdly when stress testing with AIDA.

As I said previously,  the voltage drops to an average of 1.378v as shown in HWINFO64, when it is set to 1.45v on Ryzen Master. 1.378 under load can keep 3.9Ghz stable.

BIOS OC is problematic for some reason, since it doesn't boot at 3800, 3900 or 4000 Mhz @ 1.45v, so I'm using Ryzen Master. Tried BIOS versions 2.5 and 3.4.


I'm using a Cooler Master V1000 80 Plus Gold power supply, a Cooler Master MasterLiquid 240 cooler, and temps fluctuate around 74c. 

RAM is Samsung b-die 3200mhz CL15. XMP profile is set to 3200mhz, no other settings are changed.






Cooler Master ATX V1000
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zlobster View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zlobster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Dec 2017 at 7:20pm
Are you using the latest UEFI?

You may want to tweak the LLC as well.
1700X ZP-B1 (stock); X370 Taichi (UEFI 3.10); 16GB F4-3200C14-8GFX XMP; 256GB 960 EVO; RX 580 NITRO+ 8GB
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote adsaidler Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Dec 2017 at 7:27pm
Originally posted by zlobster zlobster wrote:

Are you using the latest UEFI?

You may want to tweak the LLC as well.

zlobster, I'm using the latest UEFI. This motherboard's newer revison like the one I have does not have LLC options in the UEFI, unlike the first ones had.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote adsaidler Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Dec 2017 at 7:29pm
Right now, I'm stress testing for 30 minutes the following: 3900Mhz, 1.45v @ Ryzen Master. HWINFOI informs an average CPU Core Voltage of 1.37v. If the stress test stops, it jumps right up to 1.45v at idle.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PetrolHead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Dec 2017 at 8:12pm
Hmm. Your PSU should be a quality unit and unless you're running a multi-GPU setup it's totally overkill, so that should not cause any issues. With the VRM your motherboard has it doesn't feel like VRM temperatures should be a big issue even though the liquid cooler takes away the airflow it would receive with the stock cooler... It's also weird that BIOS overclocking would be so problematic and it sure sound like LLC is precisely the thing you would want here, assuming the CPU can do 4GHz stable in the first place. Maybe it could be worth it to contact ASRock's support directly, describe the issue and ask if they could include LLC in future BIOS updates. Just for the heck of it you could also try setting up a fan so that it cools the VRM, just to see if the extra cooling has a noticeable impact on the voltage droop.
Ryzen 5 1500X, ASRock AB350M Pro4, 2x8 GB G.Skill Trident Z 3466CL16, Sapphire Pulse RX Vega56 8G HBM2, Corsair RM550x, Samsung 960 EVO SSD (NVMe) 250GB, Samsung 850 EVO SSD 500 GB, Windows 10 64-bit
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote adsaidler Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Dec 2017 at 8:19pm
Originally posted by PetrolHead PetrolHead wrote:

Hmm. Your PSU should be a quality unit and unless you're running a multi-GPU setup it's totally overkill, so that should not cause any issues. With the VRM your motherboard has it doesn't feel like VRM temperatures should be a big issue even though the liquid cooler takes away the airflow it would receive with the stock cooler... It's also weird that BIOS overclocking would be so problematic and it sure sound like LLC is precisely the thing you would want here, assuming the CPU can do 4GHz stable in the first place. Maybe it could be worth it to contact ASRock's support directly, describe the issue and ask if they could include LLC in future BIOS updates. Just for the heck of it you could also try setting up a fan so that it cools the VRM, just to see if the extra cooling has a noticeable impact on the voltage droop.

Petrol, the PSU comes from my previous build, and is barely 1 year old, and I'm running a single 1070 now.

VRM average temps for the last hour is 84c.

I'm pretty sure it can do 4Ghz stable, since it's over an hour stress testing @ 3.9 1.38v, no problem.

I sent AsRock an email describing the issue. Do you know of any other means to get in touch with AsRock regarding this issue?

Does any AsRock technical personnel frequent this forum?

Thank you!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PetrolHead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Dec 2017 at 8:30pm
Okay, so VRM temperatures should be okay as well. I have no personal experience pushing Ryzen's to their limit, but from what I've read and heard it may be that to get 4GHz you need a big jump to the Vcore compared to 3.9GHz. That's the Vcore wall I referred to previously; it can be easy to get to a certain point and a real pain trying to push the CPU any further. In any case having access to LLC settings would probably help.

Unfortunately I don't know of any other means to get in touch with ASRock. They do sometimes respond to threads in the forum, but if it's something that can be solved through forum advice, I think you'll have more luck getting help from the forum moderators (Parsec, wardog and Xaltar, I think). They give great advice, but can't of course help if the BIOS is missing some features you would need.
Ryzen 5 1500X, ASRock AB350M Pro4, 2x8 GB G.Skill Trident Z 3466CL16, Sapphire Pulse RX Vega56 8G HBM2, Corsair RM550x, Samsung 960 EVO SSD (NVMe) 250GB, Samsung 850 EVO SSD 500 GB, Windows 10 64-bit
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adsaidler View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote adsaidler Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Dec 2017 at 8:43pm
Petrol,

Exactly, if I had LLC options to keep the voltage under load as close as possible to the defined voltage, things would go way more smoothly.

I sent the guys a private message, and am hoping they take a look at this topic!
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